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20130202
20130210
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
from super-storm sandy is a fresh memory, and so is the blizzard two years ago that dumped 20 inches here. the streets took days to clear hindering emergency vehicles and city buses. >> we're just basically stuck on this block, you know? >> reporter: g.p.s. tracking devices on garbage trucks will now allow new yorkers to punch their addresses into a web page and track when their block will be plowed. 6,100 sanitation workers are now mobilized. 400 more than two years ago. union president harry nespoli said they just started to catch their breath after sandy. >> i wouldn't say they're tired.d. they feel it, they extended themselves for sandy-- 12 hour shifts for 60 days. >> reporter: and here we go again.ca >> yes, and that's why they call new york's sanitation men new york's strongest.te >> reporter: new york city has roughly 6,300 miles of road. b that's enough to drive from here to los angeles and back. scott, the city has 250,000 tons of salt available to help keep all that roadway clear.rs >> pelley: jim, thank you. super-storm sandy also knocked down defenses against storm surge
, so no traffic in all of massachusetts, 100 days ago superstorm sandy devastated stretches of the northeast. many are stocking up on food, water, gas in case there are shortages, and there are possibilities of that. they're already warning of possible widespread powerout acknowledges, in new york city it might be ice first. we're in lower manhattan. battery park city. this is misery upon misery for superstorm sandy victims. >> certainly is. this huge snowstorm is going to hit many of the exact same areas that sandy hit so hard just about, as you said, 100 days ago. there are many people, victims of sandy, who still are not back in their homes, living in shelters, many of them. there are many who have not back into their homes but have not yet got full power. cannot run full heating. so they're going to suffer a great deal tonight with these diving temperatures. the snow and the winds that are also coming with this. and if those factors don't do enough damage, there's also great concern about the storm surge. take a look at these figures. new jersey, new york, east of new yo
by a left hook from super-storm sandy. now, new york governor andrew cuomo is proposing spendingon $400 million to buy up thousands of ruined homes so the property can be turned back into wetlands. what do the homeowners think? here's elaine quijano. >> for 11 years, joe monte worked two jobs and spent weekends renovating his statten island home. but weeks after he finished last fall, super-storm sandy swept eight feet of water inside. what did you think the first time you saw the damage from sandy? >> i came into the house with paper towels and fantastic. i stood in the middle of the room, and i called my wife and i told my wife, "there's nothing to clean here. there's nothing to do. it's done." >> reporter: monte welcomes new york governor's andrew cuomo's proposal to buy up properties like his in flood-prone areas. >> this isn't my dream. the poison that's in this home the destruction that took this neighborhood. how could you even stay here and live in this neighborhood? >> reporter: but about 30 miles away in long beach, new york fran adelson plans to rebuild. she too lost almost e
. it was expected to lose money. super-storm sandy cost allstate just over $1 billion. after closing unchanged, shares were up almost 3% in late trading, but supplemental insurer aflac fell 4.3%. it's revenues came up just shy of expectations. there was a multi-billion dollar drug deal today over multiple- sclerosis drug tysabri. bioden idec will buyout elan's interest in the drug, giving elan $3.75 billn in cash. biogesharesallied 2.3% to a new 52 week high. elan fell more than 10% as it gives up its interest in the medicine. three of the five most actively traded exchange traded funds were weaker. the japan e.t.f. had the best showing, up 1.3%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: don't call it "diet food" because it's the new definition of fast food. we're talking about low calorie meal replacement and its becoming big business. from national brands to small local startups, its getting easier to buy healthy pre-made meals, as long as you are willing to pay the price. thestreet's debra borchardt has more. >> reporter: it's no secret that americans are fighting a losing battle with
after superstorm sandy. >> hopefully we can supply them with enough food, hot food, you know, to get them through, you know, before the storm starts. >> reporter: this storm comes 35 years after the historic blizzard of 1978. two feet of snow and 70 plus -mile-per-hour winds paralyzed the northeast. what you're looking at are 50-foot tall cliffs of salt. it's really impressive out here. and they expect another 60,000 tons to be delivered tomorrow morning, before the storm. what i expect is to be using these tomorrow at this time, because -- they're ski goggles, i'll need them, with all the wind and snow. diane? >> a blizzard that fierce. thank you, ginger. and now, abc's weather editor sam champion is here. so, sam, what about the conditions? going to need goggles for this blizzard? >> reporter: absolutely. because it is blizzard. it's the worst word we can pull out in a winter storm, diane. it's brutal, blowing, blinding snow. whiteout conditions. we have warnings out for seven states here. basically stretches from new york all the way through boston and well into portland. if you l
superstorm sandy, nerves are frayed as they prepare again for storm surge. >> just really scared. terrified. >> reporter: at this boston area home depot, a much-needed shipment of ice melt arrived. >> new england tonight is struggling with the worst snowfall in its history. >> reporter: for many here, the looming storm brings back memories of the '78 blizzard that battered the region 35 years ago this week, dumping as much as 3 feet of snow, killing 100, stranding many more. fred bailis remembers it well. >> it's a cliche, but it's a perfect storm. it hit right at rush hour, it continued and it dumped a lot of snow very fast. >> reporter: city officials say they're ready for a wallop, loading sand and salt on to trucks, a fleet that could number 900 strong at the height of the storm. airlines are bracing for major travel disruptions throughout new england. 1,100 flights already cancelled. >> we're hardened new englanders and used to these types of storms but want to remind everyone to use common sense. stay off the streets of our city. basically, stay home. >> reporter: the morning rush sho
of one but allison, you're mentioning four. it appears people learned lessens following superstorm sandy and heeding the warnings. traffic bans were in place. police in new york mentioned there were hundreds of cars stuck on the long island expressway. people really thinking back to the blizzard of '78 when the last travel plan was in place in boston. residents have been getting hit hard and they're trying to keep up with the snowfall. let's take a listen. >> this is the second time i've been out. i only got this little snowblower. i need a plow. >> reporter: over 600,000 power outages around massachusetts and rhode island. outages are not as bad in new york and new jersey, connecticut. there's about 39,000 there. the airports in new york and boston, hartford, those are all closed. we're learning nuclear is trying to get -- newark is trying to get that airport open and get people in the air to their destinations. one good thing about this, we haven't seen kids yet because it's early, but it's a nice snow day for folks. it's nice it happened on the weekend, because there would have been m
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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